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Safety and Wellbeing

We all want to live in a community where we feel safe and well. It’s our right.

Making sure Australian laws are followed in all communities across the country, improving physical, social and emotional wellbeing and reducing the rates of crime, violence and substance abuse will achieve real results for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

To make this happen, government and communities need to work together to:

  • support organisations to deliver programs and services that improve physical, social and emotional wellbeing and promote resilience
  • reduce the high rates of violence, including family violence, supported by programmes and services that are culturally appropriate and informed by best practice
  • build healthier and more resilient communities that reduce the impact and prevalence of intergenerational trauma
  • develop healthy, safe and strong family environments for children, particularly those in their early years
  • lower the high rates of Indigenous incarceration by targeting the drivers of criminal behaviour, such as childhood abuse and neglect, alcohol and drug abuse, and unemployment

Feeling well and having a safe community to live in are critical to closing the gap in Indigenous disadvantage. It makes other important things possible, like getting kids to school, helping them achieve good results, and getting adults into jobs.

In addition to this, the Australian Government also supports the supply and availability of low aromatic fuel to communities and regional areas to help reduce petrol sniffing.  More information about low aromatic fuel is available on the PM&C website.

 

Recent stories

Young Aboriginal girl in red school uniform and three soldiers (2 women and 1 man) surround a white dog on a grassed area. One soldier holds a hose. In the background is a playground.
14 Aug 2019

The remote community of Jigalong in WA is getting new infrastructure, additional health services and certified training courses thanks to AACAP.

Male doctor in blue shirt uses an instrument to check the eye of another man with dreadlocks and wearing a pink beret. In the background are posters.
18 Jun 2019

Read about Dr Mark Wenitong and his passion for the 715 Health Check which are vital for Indigenous Australians.

Group of Indigenous adults in black track suits stand on steps under cover in front of a building. In front of them is an elderly man in grey suit and a woman in black dress and light jacket.
23 May 2019

Rob de Castella’s Indigenous Marathon Foundation (IMF) will kick off Reconciliation Week with the announcement of their 2019 Indigenous Marathon Project (IMP) squad.

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Contacts

Many different organisations and government agencies are working with communities to achieve real results in safety and wellbeing. Visit the websites below to find out more: