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Newslines Radio: Spotlight on Hermannsburg – education

NR-02-Education1.mp3

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Duration: 
6:00
Presenter: 
Nathan Ramsay
Talent: 

Celina Malbunka
Georgina Nash
Rex Kantawara

11 Jun 2013
Article
Transcript

Education is a big priority for Hermannsburg community.

In part two of our Newslines Radio special feature, community members talk about why school is so important and how Australian Government funded programs like the National Aboriginal Sporting Chance Academy’s ARMtour are helping to make school a fun place to be.

“I’m talking to my young cousins and nephews, ‘return to school, no matter you’re 15, 16, no matter you’re finished your ceremonies. School is important and [so is finding] a job’,” Hermannsburg community member Celina Malbunka said.

Through Stronger Futures in the Northern Territory and the Sporting Chance Program, the Australian Government is working with the Hermannsburg community to achieve greater education outcomes.

A new model of the School Enrolment and Attendance Measure is being delivered in Hermannsburg to further improve school attendance.

The National Aboriginal Sporting Chance Academy (NASCA) are operating their ARMtour project in Hermannsburg as a part of the Australian Government’s Sporting Chance Program.
 

PRESENTER: Hi, I’m Nathan Ramsay and you’re listening to Newslines Radio, an Australian Government program on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander issues.

This is part two of our three-part special feature on the central desert community of Hermannsburg, known in the local Western Arrarnta language as Ntaria.

Newslines caught up with Celina Malbunka who grew up in Hermannsburg and works in one of the two community stores. She says one of the areas the community has been working hard to improve lately is education.

Celina has seen the difference a good education has made to her own son and she says she wants that for other young people too.

MALBUNKA: With my 17 years old son, he’s going to boarding school in Brisbane. He’s really improving on Brisbane. He’s here at holidays at the moment. He comes and do a bit of work at the store with us. We want to get more young people getting involved in that one for work experience and more schooling, more education. We want to push all of these young people instead of sitting at home. We want our young people to be strong like us.

PRESENTER: Celina says it’s important for adults to speak up and show the young people why they need to stay in school.

MALBUNKA: It’s more opportunity for the young people to be involved in education and we want to get more involving on the sports and activities to be happening in Hermannsburg for our young people. There’s been a lot of drugs and alcoholic and sniffing before and it’s sort of going down now, it’s improving now.

Cause they see there’s some young people who have been drinking before, like myself, and now I’m starting to improve and I’m talking to my young cousins and nephews and I speak up and talk to them, “return to school, no matter you’re 15, 16, no matter you’re finished your ceremonies, school is important and to find a job”.

PRESENTER: One Australian Government funded program that’s helping to boost school attendance in Hermannsburg is the National Aboriginal Sporting Chance Academy’s ARMtour, or Athletes as Role Models program.

The academy’s education programs manager, Georgina Nash, has been visiting Hermannsburg with ARMtour three times a year since 2007. Newslines caught up with Georgina at a recent Ntaria School athletics carnival. She says the program is focused on using role models to engage students at remote schools.

NASH: We’re all about trying to get the kids to come to school, make school a little bit more fun for them I suppose. But it’s also about encouraging them to think about what they want to do after school. We also bring not just sports role models, they also talk about healthy lifestyles and talk about their careers, but we also bring career role models as well.

For example, this trip out in Ntaria we’ve got a horticulturalist who’s been working with the senior girls as part of their curriculum component doing a bush medicine garden.

PRESENTER: Georgina says in previous years attendance had been up by as much as 50 per cent when ARMtour was visiting. They also use a follow-up program to try and maintain that interest in school after the role models go home.

Rex Kantawara is the cultural advisor at Ntaria School. Newslines spoke to Rex at the athletics carnival too. He believes the community needs to work together to make sure children get the education they need.

KANTAWARA: If you’re going to try and get all the kids in the school, even the fella who’s been going through initiation, the only thing that’s going to happen, that’s going to work properly is community getting involved.

By getting involved in the school they’re supporting school. We’re going, the school is going to the community camps where the people living, mother and fathers living, carers living. We’ve even taken school work to show it to the parents and carers.

PRESENTER: Rex says that ultimately, it’s the parents’ and carers’ responsibility to ensure their kids get to school.

KANTAWARA: I want my mob, I’m talking about Ntaria, Hermannsburg community… it’s not hard to get up in the morning, get your kids ready and send them to school. The bus goes around every morning. I even get a lift, me and my wife, my sons, we do the same thing, get a lift to my work, I’m going with school mob on the school bus.

Everyone can get up in the morning for the kids. Act like parents I suppose. Tell your kids to go to school.

PRESENTER: Through Stronger Futures in the Northern Territory and the Sporting Chance Program, the Australian Government is working with the Hermannsburg community to achieve greater education outcomes.

A new model of the School Enrolment and Attendance Measure is being delivered in Hermannsburg to further improve school attendance.

The National Aboriginal Sporting Chance Academy are operating their ARMtour project in Hermannsburg as a part of the Australian Government’s Sporting Chance Program.

To find out more, check out the links on our website, Indigenous.gov.au. You can also follow Closing the Gap on Twitter, and like Indigenous.gov.au on Facebook.

I’m Nathan Ramsay, thanks for listening to Newslines Radio.

Stay deadly!

Find out more

Stronger Futures in the Northern Territory is a $3.4 billion investment and responds directly to what Aboriginal people told the Government was important to them.

Through Stronger Futures, the Australian Government is funding a range of programs and services in Hermannsburg to help people build independent lives where community, family and children are safe and healthy.

One important program supported through Stronger Futures which is helping to close the gap in Indigenous education outcomes in Hermannsburg is the School Enrolment and Attendance Measure (SEAM).

The Sporting Chance Program is an Australian Government initiative that uses sport and recreation to increase the level of engagement of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students in their schooling to encourage positive educational outcomes.