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Digital innovation and its role in promoting Indigenous culture

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AIATSIS CEO, Craig Ritchie, posing in front of a white background with blue framed glasses, light blue shirt and navy blue blazer.
CEO of AIATSIS, Craig Ritchie talks to PMC (Photo courtesy of AIATSIS)
1 Mar 2018

Are digital technologies a threat or an opportunity for cultural heritage institutions?

Craig Ritchie, CEO of the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies (AIATSIS) shared his views on digital disruption as part of an academic research study.

Rather than fearing that digital innovation will make cultural institutions redundant: for AIATSIS, new technologies present opportunities which were not available previously.

‘Digital innovation provides greater opportunities for AIATSIS to promote knowledge and understanding of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures, traditions, languages, and stories past and present,’ said Craig. ‘It also increases our audience and relevance locally, nationally, and internationally.’

The research conducted by Deakin University academic, Maria Shaw also found that digital innovations today allow for virtual exhibits to reach more audiences than ever before, improving accessibility.

Digital technologies allow virtual display of fragile exhibits, reducing the risk of damage in transportation, along with cost savings which can be channelled into research and conservation.

Hear more on the Cultural Heritage Institutions Curiosities Of The Past Or Vibrant Memory Institutions Podcast available on SoundCloud.

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The Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies (AIATSIS) is a world-renowned research, collections and publishing organisation. Promoting knowledge and understanding of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures, traditions, languages and stories, past and present.

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